Brazil predicts increased ethanol production, exports

By Erin Voegele | September 27, 2013

Brazil’s Agricultural Trade Office has filed its annual biofuels report with the USDA Foreign Agricultural Service’s Global Agricultural Information Network, providing ethanol production, supply and demand forecasts for 2013 and 2014.

According to the report, Brazil is expected to produce 26.57 billion liters (7.02 billion gallons) of ethanol this year, up from 23.51 billion liters in 2012. In 2014, production is expected to increase to 28.96 billion liters. Ethanol produced for fuel production is estimated to reach 23.72 billion liters this year, up from 20.74 billion liters last year. Next year, Brazil is expected to produce 25.91 billion liters of ethanol for fuel.

Brazil is expected to import 200 million liters of ethanol this year, down from 554 million liters imported in 2012. In 2011, the country imported nearly 1.14 billion liters of the fuel. Imports are expected to increase only slightly next year, reaching 250 million liters. The U.S. supplies the most imported ethanol to Brazil, followed by Jamaica and Barbados.

Ethanol fuel exports are expected to reach 2.8 billion liters this year, up from 2.5 billion liters in 2012. Next year, exports are forecast to rise again, reaching 3 billion liters. The United States is currently the primary destination for Brazilian exports, followed by Jamaica and South Korea.

Brazil is expected to consume 21.53 billion liters of fuel ethanol this year, up from 18.59 billion liters last year.  Consumption is expected to continue to increase next year, rising to 23.68 billion liters.

According to the report, Brazil currently has 399 ethanol refineries with a combined nameplate capacity of 40.7 billion liters. Capacity is expected to remain stable through 2014. In 2012, Brazil was home to 408 ethanol refineries with a combined capacity of 41.6 billion liters. Only 56 percent of Brazil’s capacity is currently being utilized. However, utilization is expected to increase to 71 percent next year.

A full copy of the report can be downloaded from the USDA website.