Attempt to reduce access to biofuels is shortsighted

By Growth Energy | October 25, 2021

Amid a global energy crisis and rising fuel prices at pumps across the country, members of the U.S. House of Representatives introduced legislation to repeal the Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS). Emily Skor released the following statement slamming the legislation for trying to reduce Americans’ access to homegrown, low carbon biofuels:

“Now, more than ever, we need to be incorporating more homegrown, low-cost, and low-carbon biofuels into our fuel supply. It’s tone deaf to introduce legislation to repeal the RFS during a global energy crisis while Americans are facing rapidly rising fuel prices at the pump.

“The RFS was signed into law over a decade ago to reduce our reliance on foreign oil and increase the blending of low-carbon biofuels, saving consumers up to $0.10 per gallon at the pump. Additionally, a recent study conducted by ABF Economics shows that moving to a nationwide adoption of  E15 — a fifteen percent ethanol blend — would save consumers $12.2 billion in annual fuel costs. We should be moving towards not away from homegrown solutions to lower fuel costs at the pump and fulfill our nation’s promise of more clean energy options.”

“We look forward to working with our champions in Congress to make sure this bill moves no further than introduction.”

Background

The Renewable Fuel Standard (RFS) was first signed into law in 2005 and renewed and expanded in 2007 as part of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007.

Sixteen years later, the RFS is one of America’s great energy success stories, and the bedrock policy that forged our nation’s global-leading biofuels industry. It provides consumers with real choices and savings at the pump, while strengthening our rural economy, lowering our carbon footprint, and delivering greater energy independence by requiring a modest but growing amount of biofuels be blended into our nation’s transportation fuel supply.

Today, 98 percent of gasoline in the U.S. contains 10 percent ethanol.